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Working Remotely + Internships: An Effective Pairing for Valuable Learning Opportunities



In the early spring of 2020, as pandemic precautions came into effect and we all retreated into our homes, our relationship with technology became more significant, meaningful, and dare I say, essential. It allowed people to stay connected to others, to continue their jobs, and, for my classmates and me, it provided the ability to complete the PWC program’s summer internship.


When the process of preparing for internships began, the concept of a remote internship hadn’t crossed my mind. In all honesty, I didn’t even realise it was a possibility. The notion sent my brain into overdrive with worries and questions. Questions like, “how can an internship be successful without actually meeting people?” (Though the introvert in me celebrated the fact that I could still complete the credit without leaving my home.)


With time and information from Humber and the PWC staff, I prepared for phone and video interviews and to work from home. (And, of course, by searching Google for answers to all of my what ifs.) After putting this prep work to the test, I was thrilled to be offered a content writing intern position with an organic skincare company. I realised very quickly how well suited the tools and skills we learned in our classes were for remote working and being successful in the writing and communications field.


The internship set-up allowed for feedback on tasks like blog posts, product descriptions, social media posts, and product catalogues from my supervisor by phone and email. Which meant I could improve my communication capabilities, learn new skills, and successfully put together completed projects. The internship turned into so much more than I was expecting when I was offered a full-time position at the end of the work term.


Initially, my worries became fears that a remote internship wouldn’t be as valuable as an in-office internship. That I wouldn’t learn as much or create any real work connections. But this experience has proved me wrong — much to my delight.


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